Tuesday, August 20, 2013

BACK TO . . . 

The back to school sales are on and it's time for us to have our first meeting of the new year.  We hope that many of you will be able to join us.  As usual you will be able to renew your memberships (dues are remaining at $15) at the meeting or you can, of course, use the form found in your newsletter and mail it in to Ruth Hofland.  

Date and Time:  August 26, 1:30PM

Place:  Chippewa Valley Museum, Carson Park

Program:  Local historian, Frank Smoot, on Fur Trade in the Chippewa Valley

Charge:  None but free will donations to the museum will be accepted

RSVP:  None 

We have met often at the museum and it's a very popular site for us.  The programs are very interesting and you will have the opportunity to tour the museum and see the new exhibits.  

Looking forward to seeing you on the 26th,
Cathy Hoffman
Past President

Thursday, August 1, 2013

I make these all the time and I NEVER feel guilty about them! They are egg-less, dairy-less, flour-less, with no added sugar and they are DELICIOUS


sweet treats 
   with coffee or tea or milk
        add a friend
              you have a blend
                that cannot
                    be beat

Retiring in Eau Claire

The first thing that attracts many retirees to Eau Claire is its affordability. The cost of living is nearly 10% below the national average and the median home costs just over $127,000. But the town has plenty going on, too, thanks in part to the presence of The University of Wisconsin Eau Claire. People 60 and up can audit classes at the university, and the school opens its planetarium and many of its music and speaking events to the public.
The city’s arts offerings, including an 1,100-seat theater, symphony orchestra and free summer concerts, are big draws as well, says retired professor Miller, who relocated here 20 years ago. “In the past 10 days there have been 11 or 12 shows here; the local talent is quite good and we get traveling shows,” she says. The best part: “You don’t have to make reservations days in advance, you can just pop down to a show, and they’re very affordable.” The downtown has experienced a rebirth in the past 10 years with dozens of new restaurants and shops, and you can take a roughly two-hour car trip to Minneapolis-St. Paul for more to do.
Eau Claire is a safe city that hosts two hospitals and a strong volunteering community. “I volunteer a lot at the state regional arts center, and there are so many other organizations you can help out with,” Miller says. These include opportunities at the theater, library, parks and the visitor’s bureau, says Linda John, the executive director of VISIT Eau Claire, the area’s tourism office. The city’s senior center is open to people 50 and older; “you can take language and computer classes, dance and exercise classes and go on trips,” John explains. The biggest downside of Eau Claire is its weather: The average January low is 4.7 degrees F., which is even lower than the state’s average.
By the numbers*:
  • Population: 65,883
  • Median home cost: $127,600
  • Cost of living: 9.8% lower than average
  • Unemployment: 5%
* Source: Sperling’s Best Places; Bureau of Labor Statistics
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Why Teaching Is Harder Than It Looks


 
Today's opinion piece explores why teaching is one of the hardest jobs out there.
by Brianna on 07/24/2013
Submitted By: Denise Hong
This piece was inspired by a heated discussion I had with a man who believes that teachers have an easy job. Please feel free to share it with others if you agree with the message.

I used to be a molecular biologist. I spent my days culturing viruses. Sometimes, my experiments would fail miserably, and I’d swear to myself in frustration. Acquaintances would ask how my work was going. I’d explain how I was having a difficult time cloning this one gene. I couldn’t seem to figure out the exact recipe to use for my cloning cocktail.
Acquaintances would sigh sympathetically. And they’d say, “I know you’ll figure it out. I have faith in you.”
And then, they’d tilt their heads in a show of respect for my skills….
Today, I’m a high school teacher. I spend my days culturing teenagers. Sometimes, my students get disruptive, and I swear to myself in frustration. Acquaintances ask me how my work is going. I explain how I’m having a difficult time with a certain kid. I can’t seem to get him to pay attention in class.
Acquaintances smirk knowingly. And they say, “well, have you tried making it fun for the kids? That’s how you get through to them, you know?”
And then, they explain to me how I should do my job….
I realize now how little respect teachers get. Teaching is the toughest job everyone who’s never done it thinks they can do. I admit, I was guilty of these delusions myself. When I decided to make the switch from “doing” science to “teaching” science, I found out that I had to go back to school to get a teaching credential.
“What the f—?!?,” I screamed to any friends willing to put up with my griping. “I have a Ph.D.! Why do I need to go back to get a lousy teaching credential?!?”
I was baffled. How could I, with my advanced degree in biology, not be qualified to teach biology?!
Well, those school administrators were a stubborn bunch. I simply couldn’t get a job without a credential. And so, I begrudgingly enrolled in a secondary teaching credential program.
And boy, were my eyes opened. I understand now.
Teaching isn’t just “making it fun” for the kids. Teaching isn’t just academic content.
Teaching is understanding how the human brain processes information and preparing lessons with this understanding in mind.
Teaching is simultaneously instilling in a child the belief that she can accomplish anything she wants while admonishing her for producing shoddy work.
Teaching is understanding both the psychology and the physiology behind the changes the adolescent mind goes through.
Teaching is convincing a defiant teenager that the work he sees no value in does serve a greater purpose in preparing him for the rest of his life.
Teaching is offering a sympathetic ear while maintaining a stern voice.
Teaching is being both a role model and a mentor to someone who may have neither at home, and may not be looking for either.
Teaching is not easy. Teaching is not intuitive. Teaching is not something that anyone can figure out on their own. Education researchers spend lifetimes developing effective new teaching methods. Teaching takes hard work and constant training. I understand now.
Have you ever watched professional athletes and gawked at how easy they make it look? Kobe Bryant weaves through five opposing players, sinking the ball into the basket without even glancing in its direction. Brett Favre spirals a football 100 feet through the air, landing it in the arms of a teammate running at full speed. Does anyone have any delusions that they can do what Kobe and Brett do?
Yet, people have delusions that anyone can do what the typical teacher does on a typical day.
Maybe the problem is tangibility. Shooting a basketball isn’t easy, but it’s easy to measure how good someone is at shooting a basketball. Throwing a football isn’t easy, but it’s easy to measure how good someone is at throwing a football. Similarly, diagnosing illnesses isn’t easy to do, but it’s easy to measure. Winning court cases isn’t easy to do, but it’s easy to measure. Creating and designing technology isn’t easy to do, but it’s easy to measure.
Inspiring kids? Inspiring kids can be downright damned near close to impossible sometimes. And… it’s downright damned near close to impossible to measure. You can’t measure inspiration by a child’s test scores. You can’t measure inspiration by a child’s grades. You measure inspiration 25 years later when that hot-shot doctor, or lawyer, or entrepreneur thanks her fourth-grade teacher for having faith in her and encouraging her to pursue her dreams.
Maybe that’s why teachers get so little respect. It’s hard to respect a skill that is so hard to quantify.
So, maybe you just have to take our word for it. The next time you walk into a classroom, and you see the teacher calmly presiding over a room full of kids, all actively engaged in the lesson, realize that it’s not because the job is easy. It’s because we make it look easy. And because we work our asses off to make it look easy.
And, yes, we make it fun, too.